in

Doctor Strange (2016)

Dr. Stephen Strange (Benedict Cumberbatch) is a respected neurosurgeon, one of the best, a top expert, but also quite a fan, with no respect for colleagues and the work of others. Throughout his life, he flies in a balloon of inflated ego and does not care too much about others, not even the people he saves. What is more important to him is a perfect record of successful cases, as well as to choose the ones he does. Success, but also fame are the only things that interest him. According to his thinking, such is his life, and he is one of those on the high leg, which includes an expensive apartment, a car, a wardrobe and everything else.

One evening, while he was running in his precious car, going to another gathering where he will amaze everyone present with his success with his speech, he lost control and landed in an abyss. He is surviving a car accident, but with catastrophic consequences, at least when it comes to him. In that accident, he loses his power, that is. the ability to operate because his arms were injured with no hope of recovery. Stephen will then give everything he has looking for a way to regain his power. That journey will eventually bring him to Kathmandu, and there he will find something he never believed in, nor does he want to believe, but therein lies the only salvation…

Marvel’s decision to entrust the film to Scott Derrickson was the right decision. Scott is a director and screenwriter whose sci-fi, occult, magical and terrifying world is a normal environment in which he works perfectly. He has several well-known and quite successful titles behind him, such as: Sinister, The Exorcism of Emily Rose, Deliver Us From Evil, The Day The Earth Stood Still. Scott did a great job here and made a real Marvel movie, and by that I mean a visual spectacle and a lot of fun, and that’s what this movie certainly provides. I would even say that he went a step further and made a kind of trap for us.

He slowly introduces us to that trap, leading us in the footsteps of the technical visual perfection of the Marvel movies we are used to, and then, when we relax, a surprise awaits us. We are falling into a trap and we are under the impact of new visual magic, such as we have not seen, which devastates all our most demanding visual expectations from one film. It simply delivers magic to us, which is what the film itself is about. Not surprisingly, he was nominated for an Oscar for special effects.

As for the story, Scott hit it off again. Interesting, fluid, no idleness takes you through the film without any hint of boredom or danger of your attention falling. I can say that everything is ironed and tuned in the classic Marvel style, as in previous films, where certain aspects of the story are perfectly dosed, to play your emotions in the right way to keep your attention focused on the film, but also permeating the already recognizable fun of Marvel movies. The film has all the features of that universe and they do it really well in every movie, justifying the epithet of entertainment that this universe carries, just as darkness is the epithet and feature of the DC universe.

Dr. Stephen Strange (Benedict Cumberbatch) is a respected neurosurgeon, one of the best, a top expert, but also quite a fan, with no respect for colleagues and the work of others. Throughout his life, he flies in a balloon of inflated ego and does not care too much about others, not even the people he saves. What is more important to him is a perfect record of successful cases, as well as to choose the ones he does. Success, but also fame are the only things that interest him. According to his thinking, such is his life, and he is one of those on the high leg, which includes an expensive apartment, a car, a wardrobe and everything else.

One evening, while he was running in his precious car, going to another gathering where he will amaze everyone present with his success with his speech, he lost control and landed in an abyss. He is surviving a car accident, but with catastrophic consequences, at least when it comes to him. In that accident, he loses his power, that is. the ability to operate because his arms were injured with no hope of recovery. Stephen will then give everything he has looking for a way to regain his power. That journey will eventually bring him to Kathmandu, and there he will find something he never believed in, nor does he want to believe, but therein lies the only salvation…

Marvel’s decision to entrust the film to Scott Derrickson was the right decision. Scott is a director and screenwriter whose sci-fi, occult, magical and terrifying world is a normal environment in which he works perfectly. He has several well-known and quite successful titles behind him, such as: Sinister, The Exorcism of Emily Rose, Deliver Us From Evil, The Day The Earth Stood Still. Scott did a great job here and made a real Marvel movie, and by that I mean a visual spectacle and a lot of fun, and that’s what this movie certainly provides. I would even say that he went a step further and made a kind of trap for us.

He slowly introduces us to that trap, leading us in the footsteps of the technical visual perfection of the Marvel movies we are used to, and then, when we relax, a surprise awaits us. We are falling into a trap and we are under the impact of new visual magic, such as we have not seen, which devastates all our most demanding visual expectations from one film. It simply delivers magic to us, which is what the film itself is about. Not surprisingly, he was nominated for an Oscar for special effects.

As for the story, Scott hit it off again. Interesting, fluid, no idleness takes you through the film without any hint of boredom or danger of your attention falling. I can say that everything is ironed and tuned in the classic Marvel style, as in previous films, where certain aspects of the story are perfectly dosed, to play your emotions in the right way to keep your attention focused on the film, but also permeating the already recognizable fun of Marvel movies. The film has all the features of that universe and they do it really well in every movie, justifying the epithet of entertainment that this universe carries, just as darkness is the epithet and feature of the DC universe.